Abortion funding: FSPC welcomes Swiss citizens’ decision

The Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches FSPC is pleased that the Swiss electorate has rejected the popular initiative “Abortion funding is a private matter.” The citizens of Switzerland have decided that abortion will continue to be covered by mandatory health insurance. On a less positive note, the FSPC deplores the approval of the initiative “Against mass immigration.”
SEK/FEPS

The Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches is convinced that abortion is not a private matter and considers it reassuring that 70 % of Swiss citizens share this view. “The public shares some responsibility in this matter. This is why we are glad that this medical procedure continues to be covered by mandatory health insurance,” said Gottfried Locher, Council President of the Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches. To eliminate this procedure from the catalogue of mandatory health insurance coverage, as suggested by the initiative, would have led to a deplorable divide between rich and poor.

But covering the costs of abortion through health insurance is not enough. The Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches calls for better support for pregnant women and families. Society must organize itself in such a way that a pregnancy is not felt to be an existential state of emergency. Abortions cannot be prevented by applying sanctions, but only by offering life perspectives.

Implementing mass immigration initiative in accordance with human rights

On a less positive note, the Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches regrets that the initiative “Against mass immigration” was narrowly approved by the Swiss electorate. The FSPC calls upon authorities to ensure that the initiative is implemented in accordance with international law and human rights.

In addition, the FSPC also demands that the subsequent immigration of family members be maintained. Human rights, such as the right to have a family life, cannot be limited by quotas: they are indivisible and the birthright of every human being. Moreover, the provisions of implementation must be compatible with the principle of unrestricted movement.